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Starting My First Herb Garden

When I decided that I wanted to grow an herb garden, my biggest issue was knowing where to start. I didn’t have any clue which herbs would be finicky and die on me, or which ones would be easy to keep alive. I had only ever worked with flowers before, and growing food felt like a whole different ball game.

I also had to think of which herbs I would actually use. There’s not much point to filling up my balcony with herbs that don’t get eaten, after all.

With these things in mind, I drove over to Bell’s Nursery and got a lot of help from an employee there. She directed me toward the cilantro and onion chives, two herbs that I use on almost everything.

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My chives right after I brought them home

After several weeks of babying these beauties, I can say that they are easy and quick to grow. They also fit very well onto a small balcony, so if your garden is confined to a small space like mine is, you’ll still be able to find a home for them.

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My balcony is just big enough to read on. No huge gardens here!

I didn’t use anything but the cheap generic brand of fertilizer and dirt from Wal-Mart, and I only watered them once in the mornings. After a month, they doubled in size. To harvest the cilantro, I simply picked off the leaves as needed and washed rather than harvesting in a big group.

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My cilantro halfway through the grow process 

To harvest the onion chives, I cut them about two inches or so above the soil. This keeps them growing and growing while also allowing me to get my fill.

I think a lot of people my age feel like growing your own food is something that hippies and those “organic types” do, and maybe they’re right, but I don’t think that that should stop people my age from learning how to grow food. I have had a revelation recently that growing our own food is an important skill, and it’s one that I’m trying to cultivate more and more as time goes on.

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Next step: Lavender

These two herbs don’t seem like much, but they have given me the confidence to try bigger, more challenging foods. They have also forced me to research my options for growing during the winter. So, if anyone out there is an expert on indoor growing, please message me or leave a comment, because I have a lot of questions for you.

Also, please leave photos of your own herb gardens in the comments. I’d love to see what setups everyone has!



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